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This site is the inspiration of a former reporter/photographer for one of New England's largest daily newspapers and for various magazines. The intent is to direct readers to interesting political articles, and we urge you to visit the source sites. Any comments may be noted on site or directed to KarisChaf at gmail.

Thursday, January 23, 2014

A presidential placebo on NSA unconstitutionality -- By Andrew P. Napolitano, The Washington Times

President Obama  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)Obama maneuver changes nothing about snooping on Americans 

When President Obama chose a Friday before a three-day holiday weekend to address a matter as profound as the National Security Agency (NSA) spying scandal, I suspected he would raise issues that he hoped the media would ignore. That's because the Reagan White House did a study in the early 1980s and concluded that Fridays are low-value news days, and thus, a good time to bury the lead, so to speak. Every president since then has followed that lead.

Instead of addressing the massive violations of the natural and constitutionally protected right to privacy; instead of acknowledging that but for the personal courage of Edward Snowden, his administration would still be pulling the wool over our eyes; and instead of re-establishing the serious constitutional and civil liberties bona fides he established for himself as a U.S. senator, the president defended his massive spying as a necessary tool in the fight to maintain national security and offered only a placebo to its critics.

Just how massive is this scandal? The Washington Post has reported that the NSA hacks into 500,000 American buddy lists and 600,000 American address books every day, and The Guardian of London reported last week that the NSA seizes 200 million American text messages every day. This is in addition to seizing the content of all cellphone- and landline-generated telephone conversations and copies of all emails sent or received in the United States. All of that is in addition to seizing all bank records, utility bills and credit card bills of everyone in the United States.

By not addressing or refuting any of this, the president obviously plans to continue it. He also plans to reject the most basic principles of American government. If the government derives its powers from the consent of the governed, as the Declaration of Independence declares it does, and if the governed lack the lawful authority to hack and seize our neighbors' texts, phone calls and utility bills, how could we have given that authority to the government?

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